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Can I legally work in QC with a SW1 (Federal) status?

About immigration to Canada, canadian immigration programms.
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mpitillo
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Posts: 59
Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2019 8:31 am
Brazil

Can I legally work in QC with a SW1 (Federal) status?

Post by mpitillo » Mon Jan 13, 2020 11:04 am

Hello everyone,

My partner and I got our Canadian PR approved back in October 2018, under the SW1 (Federal) status. When we first applied, we had the intention to live and work in Vancouver, British Columbia.

We are currently still residing in the UK, but planning to move to Canada in the next few months. However, most of the job opportunities I am being offered are located in Montreal, Quebec. Reading some information online, it sounds like that if you have a Federal Skilled Worker status, you are free to work anywhere in Canada, even if you haven't selected "QC" as your first option. But I have also come across the "Quebec-selected skilled workers" page, where it says that if your intention is to work in QC, you have to get a specific status for there. So now I am confused.. my questions are:
  • Can I legally work and live in Quebec with my SW1 PR Card, or do I have to acquire a separate one for QC?
  • Would this bring me any problem later on when I decide to renew my PR Card, given that initially I had selected British Columbia as a place of destination?
  • Once I decide to renew my PR Card, what do I need to provide as "Proof of residency requirements", such as to prove my two full years of stay (out of 5)?
Thank you so much for your time!

mpitillo
Junior Member
Posts: 59
Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2019 8:31 am
Brazil

Re: Can I legally work in QC with a SW1 (Federal) status?

Post by mpitillo » Tue Jan 14, 2020 11:13 am

Is there anyone that has gone through a similar case than me and could help me out?

Thank you!

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CR001
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Re: Can I legally work in QC with a SW1 (Federal) status?

Post by CR001 » Tue Jan 14, 2020 12:28 pm

Rare to find members on the forum familiar with every aspect of Canadian migration.
Char (CR001 not Casa)
In life you cannot press the Backspace button!!
Please DO NOT send me a PM for immigration advice. I reserve the right to ignore the PM and not respond.

mpitillo
Junior Member
Posts: 59
Joined: Sat Jul 13, 2019 8:31 am
Brazil

Re: Can I legally work in QC with a SW1 (Federal) status?

Post by mpitillo » Tue Jan 14, 2020 4:27 pm

CR001 wrote:
Tue Jan 14, 2020 12:28 pm
Rare to find members on the forum familiar with every aspect of Canadian migration.
Yes, I thought that could be the case. Thanks for the reply, though.

Either way, I think I found the answer to my question elsewhere. I would like to share it here, in case someone else come across this scenario in the future and can make good use of this info:

"You can live AND work anywhere in Canada as a PR or a Canadian citizen.
Generally speaking, it doesn't matter how you became a PR.

https://laws-lois.justice.gc.ca/eng/const/page-15.html

Mobility Rights
Marginal note:Mobility of citizens

  • 6. (1) Every citizen of Canada has the right to enter, remain in and leave Canada.

    Marginal note:Rights to move and gain livelihood
    (2) Every citizen of Canada and every person who has the status of a permanent resident of Canada has the right
    (a) to move to and take up residence in any province; and
    (b) to pursue the gaining of a livelihood in any province.


    Marginal note:Limitation
    (3) The rights specified in subsection (2) are subject to
    (a) any laws or practices of general application in force in a province other than those that discriminate among persons primarily on the basis of province of present or previous residence; and

    (b) any laws providing for reasonable residency requirements as a qualification for the receipt of publicly provided social services."

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