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How to go about getting a Job in U.K

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ukhsmp
Junior Member
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2008 4:25 pm

How to go about getting a Job in U.K

Post by ukhsmp » Mon Feb 22, 2010 7:46 pm

Hi all,
I am currently trying to get a job or understand the Market before coming to U.K. I am currently in the U.S for onsite thro my company in india and holding a valid Tier1-Visa which will end in Dec-2011. I am planning to come over there in July 2010 after Quiting my job . I just want to know how to go about this or what process consultants follow.

1. Once you update your profile in the Job portals will consultants give you a call
or
2. You have to apply for all the Job ad you get from the Job portals and then wait for them to either call you or you directly call the consultants and give a small talk about your current position and what oppurtunities you are looking for.
ukhsmp

raghava39@rediffmail.com
Junior Member
Posts: 98
Joined: Sat Dec 27, 2008 5:50 pm

Post by raghava39@rediffmail.com » Tue Feb 23, 2010 5:27 pm

Physically being present in UK might boost the chances of getting a rare call in the dry market. I keep hearing from friends that for each job there are enormous responses and our skill should be a good match and same should get projected in the resume too.

You could call up the consultants based on a job opening in the websites.

Thanks
Raghavendran G

Gander
Newly Registered
Posts: 3
Joined: Tue Feb 23, 2010 9:19 pm
Contact:

Awesome

Post by Gander » Tue Feb 23, 2010 9:31 pm

That's what I was looking for. Thanks for sharing.

Best wishes and good fortune to you.

KG

Tim555
Senior Member
Posts: 532
Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2010 1:36 am
Location: London

Post by Tim555 » Sun Feb 28, 2010 6:23 am

raghava39@rediffmail.com wrote:Physically being present in UK might boost the chances of getting a rare call in the dry market. I keep hearing from friends that for each job there are enormous responses and our skill should be a good match and same should get projected in the resume too.

You could call up the consultants based on a job opening in the websites.

Thanks
Raghavendran G
true
Each and every one of us can make a difference. All right everyone, line up alphabetically according to your height.

joe_2010
Newly Registered
Posts: 8
Joined: Thu Jan 21, 2010 12:23 pm

info about genuine consultants at UK

Post by joe_2010 » Fri Mar 26, 2010 3:12 am

Hi,

Requesting if anyone, who has found a job ,to post links/info about good consultants in UK.
This would provide a good starting point for new job seekers at UK.

Thanks in Advance
Joe

Tim555
Senior Member
Posts: 532
Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2010 1:36 am
Location: London

Re: info about genuine consultants at UK

Post by Tim555 » Sun Mar 28, 2010 1:05 am

joe_2010 wrote:Hi,

Requesting if anyone, who has found a job ,to post links/info about good consultants in UK.
This would provide a good starting point for new job seekers at UK.

Thanks in Advance
Joe
The best way to apply the job is ONLINE submission of CV, if you match the job requirment and its your relevent field. Its very quick and effective. If employer/advertisor short list your CV than straightaway they can contact you by email or by call and get a short interview over the phone if you sound them ok they will invite you for interview. During interview they will focus on following points:

-Your skills
-The employer
-The job
-Your ambitions
-Your work history
-Your motivation
-The product or service
-Team working
-Your personality and interests
-Unusual questions

Your skills
Typical questions an interviewer might ask:

What are your strengths and weaknesses?
What can you do for us that other candidates can't?
What would your colleagues and friends say your best qualities were?
Why should we hire you?
What the interviewer really wants to know: They want to know if you can do the job.


Know your strengths, and mention ones that are relevant to the job you're being interviewed for. It's important to quote examples of when you used the skills; it's not enough to just say you have the skills. Typical strengths employers look for are:

Communication - the ability to get on with a wide range of people
Team working - the ability to be an effective team leader or team member
IT skills - most jobs these days need some IT skills
Good attitude - hard worker, honest, polite, co-operative
Problem solving - using your initiative to identify solutions
Enthusiasm - employers like someone positive
Quick learner - so you can take on new tasks
Determination - shows you are focused on achieving goals
Flexibility - doing a variety of tasks to achieve a common goal.
If you're asked about weaknesses, don't list many - only mention one! Choose a minor flaw that isn't essential to the job. And turn it into a positive, such as how you've improved on the weakness. Or you could present it as an opportunity for development.

Good answers:

Strengths: "I'm a good organiser, and I plan everything in detail. I showed this when I was given a new project, and I had to get it up and running from scratch."
Weaknesses: "Sometimes I'm too enthusiastic when working on a new project. But I've learned to adjust to everyone else's pace, and not go charging ahead."

The employer
Typical questions:

Why do you want to work here?
What do you know about our company?
What can you do for us that someone else can't?
What the interviewer really wants to know: Do you know what we do? Why have you chosen to apply to this company?


The interviewer wants to know you've done your homework and you know about their organisation and their aims. They want to know you've thought it through and you've chosen to apply to them for a good reason. Show your knowledge of the company by having some facts and figures at the ready, such as:

the size of the organisation
what the product or service is
last year's turnover figures
latest developments in the field
the history, goals, image and philosophy of the employer.
When talking about why you want to work for the employer, focus on what you can do for them, not on what they can do for you.

Good answer:

"Smith's is a respected firm with a reputation for high quality work, and I'd like to be part of that success. The quality of my work is important to me, so I feel I'd be at the right place. I've also heard you invest in your staff by training and developing them."

About the job
Typical questions:

What will the main tasks and responsibilities be in this job?
What do you think the main challenges will be?
What would you do in the first day/week/month/year?
What the interviewer really wants to know: Do you know what the job's all about?


The interviewer wants to know if you fully understand what the job will involve. They want to know why you think you'd be good at it, and how you'd approach it if they offer you the job. To answer this question well, make sure you read the job description thoroughly and research how the organisation operates.

Good answer:

"The main task is to supervise a team of sales staff to ensure they exceed sales targets. It's my responsibility to motivate them and pass on my sales experience to enable them to achieve more."

Your ambitions
Typical questions:

What are your goals?
Where do you see yourself in five years time?
What the interviewer really wants to know: How ambitious are you?


This is your chance to show how enthusiastic you are to get on. However, you should avoid sounding too aggressive and over-ambitious: "I want to become managing director in three". Also avoid sounding unenthusiastic and passive: "I'm not sure - I'll see how it goes".

To avoid this, you could talk in terms of short-term and long-term goals. Remember you are at the interview for that particular job - so your short-term goal should be to get that job for the time being. Then you can start talking about moving on higher.

Good answer:

"My immediate aim is to get a trainee chef position, then to work through NVQs level 2 and 3 to become a qualified chef."

Your work history
Typical questions:

Why did you leave your last job?
Tell me about a typical day in your current/previous job
What experience have you got from previous jobs?
What the interviewer really wants to know: What have you done in your previous jobs?


When talking about previous jobs, focus on the positives. Even if you think your previous or current job wasn't very demanding, if you jot down the tasks and responsibilities it will sound more impressive than you think. You will have learned something, so mention it. Focus on the skills and experience that are relevant to the job you're being interviewed for.

Don't bring up negative things like having a dispute with a colleague or your boss. And don't criticise previous employers.

Good answer:

"In my current job I have developed my knowledge of computer software packages. But now I'm ready for a new challenge, and want to use these skills in a more customer-focused role."

Your motivation
Typical questions:

What motivates you?
Which tasks do you get the most satisfaction from?
What the interviewer really wants to know: What makes you tick?


By finding out what motivates you, the interviewer can find out which environment you'll perform well in. Try to think of examples of when a work task excited you.

Good answer:

"I like problem solving - that point you reach in a project where you come up against something unexpected, and you have to think creatively to come up with a solution."

About the product or service
Typical questions:

What do you know about our products/services?
What do you think of our products/services?
Can you think of any improvements to our products/services?
What the interviewer really wants to know: Are you keen enough to have looked at our products and services?


The employer wants to know that you're familiar with their products or services. They may also want you to have the initiative to look for ways of improving things. Be tactful though, and only mention small improvements. And make these the kind of suggestions people in the street might come up with; not because you are an "expert" and know best.

Good answer:

"Your products are recognised as the industry standard, leading the way in style and performance. However, maybe by altering your advertising style you could appeal to older consumers as well as young ones. I think older people would value your product just as much, and this could lead to increased sales."

Team working
Typical questions:

What makes a good team?
What makes a good team member?
What makes a good team leader?
What the interviewer really wants to know: Can you operate effectively in a team?


Employers value team-working very highly. They want to know you can work effectively in a team, whatever your role within it is.

Good answer:

"A good team needs to have clear objectives and goals, and procedures to work towards these. Each person needs to be clear what their role is, and what is expected of them. There needs to be openness and trust, and clear communication."

Your personality and interests
Typical questions:

What was the last film you saw or the last book you read?
How would you describe yourself?
How would your friends describe you?
What the interviewer really wants to know: Are you a well-rounded individual?


By asking personality questions, the employer wants to know how well you know yourself - how self-aware you are. Having self-awareness means you can look at yourself critically, which means you'll know what you're good at and where you could improve.

When it comes to your interests, the employer wants to know you're an active citizen, who tries to get the most out of life. If you’re to be driven and enthusiastic in work, you will probably also be like this in your personal life.

When choosing examples of interests to mention, try to choose a wide range to show you're well-balanced. However, when quoting films or books, choose classic or mainstream ones rather than obscure or extreme ones.

Some employers will expect you to know about current affairs and popular culture - jobs in the media, for example.

Good answer:

"In my personal life I'm always organising everybody. People look to me for ideas and plans - I guess in some ways that shows I'm a natural leader."

The unusual question
Typical questions:

If you were a biscuit, what type of biscuit would you be?
If you were an animal, what type of animal would you be?
What the interviewer really wants to know: Can you think on the spot and come up with a sensible answer?


You probably won't have prepared for this, so the interviewer is seeing if you can think on your feet. Take your time over this question, and think of something that generally reflects you, but also has positives you could apply to the world of work.

Good answer:

This one's up to you!

Wish you good luck and hope for the best.

Regards,

TIm
Each and every one of us can make a difference. All right everyone, line up alphabetically according to your height.

Wanderer
Diamond Member
Posts: 10511
Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2005 12:46 pm
Ireland

Post by Wanderer » Sun Mar 28, 2010 6:24 am

http://careersadvice.direct.gov.uk/help ... stions.htm

Always polite to cite your sources, otherwise people might think you wrote it yourself, which you didn't.
An chéad stad eile Stáisiún Uí Chonghaile....

Tim555
Senior Member
Posts: 532
Joined: Thu Feb 11, 2010 1:36 am
Location: London

Post by Tim555 » Sun Mar 28, 2010 6:43 pm

Wanderer wrote:http://careersadvice.direct.gov.uk/help ... stions.htm

Always polite to cite your sources, otherwise people might think you wrote it yourself, which you didn't.
Other people are not interested who wrote ( like you ). They are much interested what is written :lol:

Many thanks for your cute little innocent effort, take the credit as I dont need it. Could you please also find the link for following:

'''The best way to apply the job is ONLINE submission of CV, if you match the job requirment and its your relevent field. Its very quick and effective. If employer/advertisor short list your CV than straightaway they can contact you by email or by call and get a short interview over the phone if you sound them ok they will invite you for interview.''''

Much appreciate in advance for your kind innocent help 8)
Each and every one of us can make a difference. All right everyone, line up alphabetically according to your height.

arsenal49
Diamond Member
Posts: 1739
Joined: Sun Jan 24, 2010 12:04 am

Post by arsenal49 » Tue Mar 30, 2010 6:36 pm

in the world of academic, what you have done there, tim, is called PLAGIARISM and its a serious enough offence to warrant expulsion from the uni/college... so i hope you realise gravity of the matter.

Its good to know that you have taken the effort to track down this article and copy pasted it but dont you think credit should go to the person who published it on his/her website.

What if someone wants to do follow up from your post. He will have nowhere to go. But if there is a link... thats one lead right there.

Hope you see my point.

Keep up the good work

regards

kenfrapin
Senior Member
Posts: 601
Joined: Wed May 13, 2009 8:07 pm
Contact:

Post by kenfrapin » Tue Mar 30, 2010 7:32 pm

Tim555,

Did you not go on and on about how I am a photocopier and only duplicating you very recent one liner answer to someone?
May I know what you are doing here? You have done this before and when I confronted you, all I got was some snide remark.

Well it's out here in the open. You wrote so much in this post, actually PHOTOCOPIED 99% from somewhere, put a few words of your own and yet you dont see yourself as one??? All you had to do was quote your sources and not hide behind it.
So let me repeat what I stated earlier - make sure you dont accuse others of something when you do it yourself many many times

Cheers
KP

nasirraza_31
Junior Member
Posts: 50
Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2010 5:47 pm
Location: Scotland

Post by nasirraza_31 » Wed Mar 31, 2010 11:23 am

Hi ukhsmp,

I came to UK in September 2008 on tier-1 visa after quitting my job with an Indian company. Thats exactly when the bubble burst happend. Lehman brother collapsed and things started to crumble.

I followed the same old technique of applying through job portals. I had prior experience of working in UK through my indian company.

It took me 5 weeks to get my first job offer. In the end I had two offers (MashaAllah).

Since then I have changed two more jobs.

What I am trying to say here is that If your skills are good and there is some demand in market then you will get it. You just need to be patient.

My tips will be -

1. Preapare a good cover letter and CV.
2. Brush your technical skills.
3. Be confident and try to speak correct english.
4. Never tell that you are interviewing with some one else (Neither to an agent nor to the company you have gone to interview with)
5. Show them that you are very eager to join and stay for long time.
6. Closure is important in interview. So make sure that you thank them and put emphasis that you are the best person to do that job.
7. Try to be friendly in interview. You will find interviews are more casual than what we have in India.


This is all on my own personal experience.

I am not sure if you are in IT or some other field. I am a Java-J2EE developer with 6 years of experience.

I hope this helps.

Let me know if you need any more info.

I am sure everyone wants to help others here. Thats the motive of this forum.

I wish you luck!

ukhsmp
Junior Member
Posts: 54
Joined: Fri Jan 11, 2008 4:25 pm

Post by ukhsmp » Sat Apr 03, 2010 12:46 am

Hi nasirraza_31,
Thanks for your valuable inputs. I am also a Java, J2ee developer with over 6 yrs of exp. I am currently in Banking domain working for a Big client in the U.S. I am not resigning my job from my indian company but taking 6 months of leave. I am planning to come over to U.K in 2nd week of June. Please let me know if I need any relieving letter from my indian company, what sort of docs should I provide for my I.T experience . Thanks in advance
ukhsmp

pyke
Member
Posts: 219
Joined: Sat Jan 12, 2008 1:31 pm

Post by pyke » Mon Apr 05, 2010 3:15 pm

nasirraza_31 wrote: I followed the same old technique of applying through job portals.
Hi nasirraza,

By job portals do you mean websites which advertise jobs from a variety of agencies, using recruitment agents or direct to the companies?

I am getting rather disillusioned with recruitment agents who appear enthusiastic initially but fall silent after I've submitted my application to them.

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