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new green card scheme, implement from jan2007.

Forum to discuss all things Blarney | Ireland immigration

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new green card scheme, implement from jan2007.

Post by robby1 » Wed Dec 27, 2006 8:42 pm

hi ,guys here is information about new green card scheme for skilled workers and bit matter of worry for so-called international students coming to ireland in search of work announced by Enterprise Minister Micheál Martin .
:D 27 December 2006

Green cards for skilled foreign workers

By Harry McGee
THE first Irish “green cards” for foreign workers will be issued early in the new year, Enterprise Minister Micheál Martin has confirmed.


In an interview with the Irish Examiner, the minister said that the regulations providing for the green cards will be signed into law during January.

The scheme, first revealed in this newspaper last year, is designed to attract high-skilled foreign workers to this country. It is the first time that Ireland has introduced a residency card that does not require the immigrant to get sponsored by an employer.
The minister expected that as many as 10,000 people from all over the world would avail of the scheme when it was fully operational — with a take-up of about 5,000 in the first year.

The new scheme would be split into two categories. The first is targeted at those with potential earnings of over €60,000 with high skills who would not need a sponsoring employer.

The second is a new work permit provision for workers with an earning potential of between €30,000 and €60,000 who are required for sectors with specific skill shortages. These include the IT and computer industries as well as pharmaceuticals.

Those in the second category coming in with the new green card would have a work permit for two years, not one year as in the existing scheme, and would also be allowed to change employers. “The whole idea of the Green Card revolves around the area of high skills,” said Mr Martin.

He pointed to other key areas, including engineering, technology-related specialities, scientists, as well as specialised sales and marketing professionals.

He also said that his department would be clamping down on students who were ostensibly coming into Ireland to do short courses, but were in reality arriving to find work. :(

Click here for irishexaminer.com stories before this date

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Green Card

Post by pjungfisio » Wed Jan 03, 2007 1:59 pm

Hi Robbie,
Thanks for relaying the information regarding the Green Card. I am an Aussie planning to work in Ireland and it appears the Irish Govt are scrapping the work visa/work authorisation according to the Irish Embassy in Australia as of 31/12/06. The Green Card is I think replacing the old scheme, am i correct mate. It's hard to find any information on this, I have emailed every known government department in Ireland for more info and surfed the WWW but no new information...oh well will see what unfolds..Cheers mate

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Post by joesoap101 » Wed Jan 03, 2007 2:47 pm

Its a pity Ireland isnt itroducing a system like the UK (SEGS for example) where foreign graduates with Bacherlors, Masters or PhD degrees are allowed to work in the country if they can find a relevant job. This makes so much more sense considering that these students have already lived in the country for 4-7 years.

I do however agree that students coming to Ireland to do short courses only to work should be stamped out, in fact this has already been done to some degree. Unless you're doing a full time course of 1 year leading to a qualification, you are no longer permitted to work part time.

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Skilled shortages

Post by pjungfisio » Thu Jan 04, 2007 2:04 am

Does anyone know what occupations are considered as skilled shortages in Ireland and can therefore be eligible for the Green Card, particularly for occupations between the 30-60K euros that the Minister for Employment is referring to.?!

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Post by joesoap101 » Thu Jan 04, 2007 2:00 pm

Most of the information available is quite vague and it seems the 30k-60k segment of the 'green card' scheme would in fact just be an extended work permit which is valid for 2 years. IT and computer industries, as well as pharmaceuticals and biotechnology, engineering, scientists, marketing professionals and technology related specialities are mentioned.

Dont get too excited about this scheme, if anything it makes immigration to ireland even more difficult with the salary requirements.

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Post by pjungfisio » Fri Jan 05, 2007 7:50 am

Any news when this new green card scheme will be introduced for people to apply?!

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Post by joesoap101 » Sat Jan 06, 2007 12:01 am

You would hope quite soon considering the work authorisation/visa scheme has been suspended since the 31st Dec 2006. The minister has said that the legislation will be signed in Jan but this is Ireland so hope for the best and expect the worst!

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Post by Administrator » Sat Jan 06, 2007 9:32 am

.

I am interested in following this topic more closely.

If folks would care to provide the URL's of the sources of their information, that would be very much appreciated.

It is my job to investigate such regulations, policy & news. If I find new information, it will be contributed to this thread.

I created a news release based upon this thread here :

Ireland ready to sign new Irish "green card" legislation
http://www.workpermit.com/news/2007_01_ ... n_card.htm

Unfortunately, I couldn't find anything to enhance the information already in this thread. I would lke to follow-up on this with more detail and update the Ireland section of our website ( http://www.workpermit.com/ireland/ireland.htm ).

Thank you!

The Admin

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Post by pjungfisio » Sat Jan 06, 2007 1:17 pm

Thanks Administrator, I guess we have to be patient with this new green card scheme as it is a new legislation and all the fanfare that is required to be law. There's absolutely no information on this topic, in particular what occupations are eligible for this new scheme which is quite important if people are considering a move to Ireland and also what the process is going to be when applying. I thought if this legislation was in its final stages then some information should have been released to the public to view but oh well. This is an email from a member of Forfas, the group responsible in providing info to the Minister of Employment regarding sectors with skilled shortages:

Dear Peter,
Legislation was introduced last year empowering the Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment to introduce a permanent Green Card system. The introduction of such a system, however requires further Ministerial Regulation. I understand that such a regulation is forthcoming, although as of yet I have no exact timescale.

This regulation will contain details as to the operation of the system and the occupations which will be prioritised with respect to the awarding of Green Cards. The final responsibility for determining which occupations will be prioritised lies with the Minister and his department.

Unfortunately I cannot be more specific at this time. However, I would suggest that you contact the Department of Enterprise, Trade and Employment.

Until such time as the Green Card system is implemented, potential migrants can still avail of the existing Visa & Work Permit systems, details of which can be found at www.entemp.ie

In the meantime, do not hesitate to contact me if you need any further information.
Best wishes.

Doesn't help hey!
Cheers

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Post by joesoap101 » Sat Jan 06, 2007 2:50 pm

In addition to www.entemp.ie some information can be obtained by viewing the Dail debates (Irish parliamentary debates) where the relevant minister is questioned about schemes such as this, but the answer given is usually very general! I believe they don't want to create false hopes.

The legislation is called the Employment Permits Bill 2005 which has already been passed into law I believe. This law now gives power to the minister of enterprise and employment to develop the green card scheme - this is just my take on it though.

http://www.oireachtas.ie/ViewDoc.asp?fn=/home.asp (Irish Parliament)
http://www.entemp.ie/

These two sites usually contain the most info, but we all know even this is limited.

Actually an interesting point- The work authorisation/visa had very low uptake and even those who were eligible still made use of the work permit route. This is a pity because the work authorisation/visa scheme had much more flexibility and was valid for 2 years. I think the new green card is just another name for this scheme with a few additions of employment categories.

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Post by first2last4 » Sat Jan 06, 2007 9:24 pm

Is the green card in Ireland not a Permanent Residency i.e. Similar to ILR in UK?
Knowledge which is concealed is lost -Hadith

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Post by joesoap101 » Sun Jan 07, 2007 7:19 pm

No it is absolutely nothing like permanent residency. There is no equivalent of ILR in Ireland. The only long term categories at present are long term residency which can be applied for after 5 years, giving you permission to remain for a further 5 years, and exemption from the requirement to obtain work permits (not always the case). A stamp giving permission to remain without condition as to time after 8 years of residency, neither of these come near to providing the same rights as ILR in the UK.

The 'green card' is a new name for a scheme that was already in existence with a few tweaks. Initial permission for 2 years, then renewable for 3 years - which will have to be renewed again if you apply for naturalisation because processing of naturalisation takes 2-3 years.

Hopefully the government publishes the scheme soon and say that after 5 years on the 'green card' you will be entitled to permanent residency. They keep watering it down though.

Calling it a green card is an attempt to make it seem like the US green card when in fact it is nothing of the sort!

But we just have to wait and see when they publish the conditions of the scheme, hopefully we are surprised!

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Post by JAJ » Sun Jan 07, 2007 7:27 pm

joesoap101 wrote:No it is absolutely nothing like permanent residency. There is no equivalent of ILR in Ireland. The only long term categories at present are long term residency which can be applied for after 5 years, giving you permission to remain for a further 5 years, and exemption from the requirement to obtain work permits (not always the case). A stamp giving permission to remain without condition as to time after 8 years of residency, neither of these come near to providing the same rights as ILR in the UK.
EEA/Swiss nationals living in Ireland for 5 years become Permanent Residents due to the operation of European law.
Initial permission for 2 years, then renewable for 3 years - which will have to be renewed again if you apply for naturalisation because processing of naturalisation takes 2-3 years.
And it's worth noting that permanent residence is not required in order to apply for naturalisation.

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Post by first2last4 » Sun Jan 07, 2007 7:56 pm

joesoap101 wrote: Calling it a green card is an attempt to make it seem like the US green card when in fact it is nothing of the sort!
Oh bloody so confusing, they have named it as green card making it sound like ILR in US. But apparently its more or less like HSMP in UK....
Knowledge which is concealed is lost -Hadith

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Post by Administrator » Mon Jan 08, 2007 8:08 am

.

Thanks for the feedback, folks. As you run across more, I am watching. Hopefully today & tomorrow I can do some research and see what I can shake loose.

I'll contribute what I can here.

Some nice details you guys have added .... THANK YOU!

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Post by joesoap101 » Mon Jan 08, 2007 2:58 pm

JAJ I think most people would be aware of the European legislation regarding permanent residency, however that is irrelevant to the topic which concerns only non-EU nationals. You forgot to mention that not only are EEA/Swiss nationals eligible but also family members of EEA/Swiss nationals and that the first opportunity anyone will be eligible to apply for this is in 2012.

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Post by JAJ » Tue Jan 09, 2007 1:44 am

joesoap101 wrote:JAJ I think most people would be aware of the European legislation regarding permanent residency, however that is irrelevant to the topic which concerns only non-EU nationals. You forgot to mention that not only are EEA/Swiss nationals eligible but also family members of EEA/Swiss nationals and that the first opportunity anyone will be eligible to apply for this is in 2012.
I don't know where the date of 2012 comes from.

In the United Kingdom, permanent residence for EEA/Swiss nationals plus family members who had been in the UK for 5+ years took effect on 30 April 2006.

The only exception concerned countries not in the EU for 5 years at that date. In that case the 5 year clock starts ticking at Accession.

And I would not necessarily assume these rules are widely known.

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Post by pjungfisio » Tue Jan 09, 2007 11:18 am

Hi guys...this is an email from the Department of Employment:
Dear Peter,
Details of the new Economic Migration arrangements, which shall take effect on 1 Feb 07, shall be posted on the Department's website www.entemp.ie before the end of January.

Hope this helps everyone. Cheers

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Post by Administrator » Tue Jan 09, 2007 1:33 pm

.

Hi folks ....

A two-page announcement was posted. Here are links and the first half-page or so of the Word *.doc:

http://www.entemp.ie/labour/workpermits/


http://www.entemp.ie/labour/workpermits ... tional.doc
Employment Permits Act 2006 – Transitional Economic Migration Arrangements January-February 2007

The Employment Permits Act 2006 was brought into force with effect from 1 January 2007. This legislation puts in place the statutory framework to facilitate the new economic migration arrangements including green card employment permits for highly skilled occupations where there are skills shortages. The Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment will launch these new arrangements on 24 January and they will be implemented from 1 February.

The transitional arrangements are as follows:

Work Permits

Work Permit Applications received before 1 January 2007
Applications that were received before 1 January 2007 are being examined and processed in accordance with the regime in place up to that time.

Work Permit Applications received during January 2007
Work permit applications received during January will be assessed and granted in the same manner as before consistent with the requirements of the Employment Permits Act 2006. This means for example that the permits will be granted to the employee and will be accompanied by the information referred to in the Act.

Work Permit Applications received after 31 January 2007
Work Permit applications received after 31 January will be processed and assessed in accordance with the new arrangements. These new arrangements will include new work permit application forms, new work permits with additional security features and a strengthened labour market test, including evidence of advertising in national newspapers.

Work Visa/Work Authorisations/Green Cards
With effect from 1 January 2007, Irish embassies abroad and, where applicable the Department of Justice, Equality and Law Reform are not accepting new Work Visa/Work Authorisation applications and this scheme has been discontinued.

It is being replaced by the Green Card which will come into operation from 1 February. Any urgent Work Visa/Work Authorisations applications received before 1 February will be dealt with by issuing work permits (in respect of which applications may be made to convert them to Green Cards, if eligible, after 1 February).
I don't have anything more just yet, but this fleshes out a few details.

Thanks for giving me the heads-up on this!!

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Post by joesoap101 » Tue Jan 09, 2007 3:51 pm

I was refferring to those who were given permission in Jan 2007 who are family members of EEA/Swiss nationals.

The statement regarding the new work permit/green card system on www.entemp.ie seems positive, esp the following

-work permit granted to employee (not employer as done previously)
-new spousal scheme
-new graduate scheme

Not so positive:
-strengthened labour market test

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Post by Administrator » Thu Jan 11, 2007 3:24 pm

.

Hi --

A couple of articles posted at our parent site :

Ireland needs 500,000 workers, calls for immigration policy review
http://www.workpermit.com/news/2007_01_ ... review.htm

Ireland announces Irish "green card" and skilled work transition
http://www.workpermit.com/news/2007_01_ ... ements.htm

Nothing earth-shattering as far as news goes, but a few extra details that might be useful.

The Admin

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Post by purpleday » Fri Jan 12, 2007 1:38 am

Hi

does anyone have any idea where should the urgent application for WA be sent to? is the WA procedures (ie form, fee, processing time) still usable for this 'urgent application' cases? I've been calling DETE but nobody's picking up. I'm due to start work at the end of january. I doubt I could, though... Such a bad timing.

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new green card scheme any update plz

Post by chintu0613 » Fri Jan 12, 2007 9:09 pm

i am on a student visa in UK and was about to file my papers for working visa to ireland...but found out from the embassy that they have suspended the programme till 1st feb.....I am having 2years of work experience before i came to UK & my previous salary falls in the range of Euro 30,000 to 60,000...I am into IT field & completed my IT cource in UK....

Can anyone plz tell me whether I will still b able 2 apply under the changed rules & regulations of green card scheme....I will b very thankful for ur replies & suggestions....

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Post by pjungfisio » Fri Jan 12, 2007 11:04 pm

It seems we have to wait until late january to find out which jobs are eligible to apply for the greencard. The legislation is in effect Feb 1st.

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Students in Ireland

Post by hasanum2 » Sun Jan 14, 2007 5:20 pm

I am totally agree with in this matter. Who ever studing here in Masters or Ph.d has to leave this country after completion of their study. After completion of my masters i tried for jobs and realize Irish law about student to get a job is strict thats no..means u has 2 leave this country after finish ur study..in the contrary they have loads of one room "visa college" where people get admission and stay here for as many years as they want and work full time. The irony is Irish laws are strict about high skill foreign people who studied inside Ireland and flexible to outside.may b they dont have trust in their education system.. I got work permit in UK and most foreign student do the same thing. Its pity that where i study n have loads of friends n memories, dont give any opportunity.

Thanks

hassan

quote="joesoap101"]Its a pity Ireland isnt itroducing a system like the UK (SEGS for example) where foreign graduates with Bacherlors, Masters or PhD degrees are allowed to work in the country if they can find a relevant job. This makes so much more sense considering that these students have already lived in the country for 4-7 years.

I do however agree that students coming to Ireland to do short courses only to work should be stamped out, in fact this has already been done to some degree. Unless you're doing a full time course of 1 year leading to a qualification, you are no longer permitted to work part time.[/quote]

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